Choose plant-derived
ESTRACE® CREAM

The #1-prescribed FDA-approved treatment for VVA among OB/GYNs1

Why choose ESTRACE®?

ESTRACE® helps maintain vulvar and vaginal health.

ESTRACE® CREAM is a local estrogen therapy that treats moderate to severe VVA symptoms due to menopause, in and around the vagina.2

  • Plant-derived, 17β-estradiol is structurally and chemically identical to endogenous estrogen2,3
    • There is no evidence that the use of “natural” estrogens results in a different endometrial risk profile than synthetic estrogens of equivalent estrogen doses

The ESTRACE® CREAM Experience

  • Emollient-based
    • Formulated with stearyl alcohol, an emollient that may prevent moisture loss2,4
  • Nonliquefying
    • Formulated with a nonliquefying base that remains viscous at body temperature5
  • Flexible dosing to meet individual patient needs6

Is your postmenopausal patient using a lubricant? Ask her if it’s helping.

Some women may be reluctant to tell you that they are experiencing moderate to severe vaginal symptoms. Your patient may not know that she has VVA or that it is a chronic condition.7,8

See survey results.

When a lubricant isn't enough, and local estrogen therapy is appropriate, choose ESTRACE®.

Learn more about ESTRACE®

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Resources for your practice.

ESTRACE® provides resources to help support your office and recommendations, including patient savings cards, samples, and patient materials.

Find helpful resources


  1. IMS Health, Inc. National Prescription AuditTM (NPA): May 2016-May 2017 (information used under license from IMS Health, Inc., which expressly reserves all rights, including rights of copying.)
  2. ESTRACE® CREAM [package insert]. Irvine, CA: Allergan USA, Inc.; 2017.
  3. Harvard Health Publications Website. What are bioidentical hormones? www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/What-are-bioidentical-hormones.htm. Accessed March 8, 2017.
  4. Stearyl alcohol. ChemicalLand21 Website; www.chemicalland21.com/industrialchem/solalc/STEARYL%20ALCOHOL.htm. Accessed March 8, 2017.
  5. Data on file. Clinical Study Report RR09111.0. Allergan: Parsippany, NJ.
  6. Lynch C. Vaginal estrogen therapy for the treatment of atrophic vaginitis. J Womens Health. 2009:18(10);1595-1606.
  7. Nappi RE, Kokot-Kierepa M. Vaginal Health: Insights, Views & Attitudes (VIVA). Results from an international survey. Climacteric. 2012;15:36-44.
  8. Wysocki S, Kingsberg S, Krychman M. Management of Vaginal Atrophy: Implications from the REVIVE Survey. Clin Med Insights Reprod Health. 2014;8:23-30. doi: 10.4137/CMRH.S14498.
INDICATIONS AND USAGE

ESTRACE CREAM (estradiol vaginal cream, USP, 0.01%) is indicated in the treatment of moderate to severe symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy due to menopause.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
WARNINGS: ENDOMETRIAL CANCER, CARDIOVASCULAR DISORDERS, BREAST CANCER AND PROBABLE DEMENTIA

There is an increased risk of endometrial cancer in a woman with a uterus who uses unopposed estrogens. Adding a progestin to estrogen therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia, which may be a precursor to endometrial cancer. Adequate diagnostic measures, including directed or random endometrial sampling when indicated, should be undertaken to rule out malignancy in postmenopausal women with undiagnosed persistent or recurring abnormal genital bleeding.

Estrogens with or without progestins should not be used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia.

The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) estrogen-alone substudy reported increased risks of stroke and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in postmenopausal women with daily oral conjugated estrogens (CE) alone. The WHI estrogen-plus-progestin substudy reported increased risks of DVT, pulmonary embolism, stroke, and myocardial infarction in postmenopausal women with daily oral CE combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). In the absence of comparable data, these risks should be assumed to be similar for other dosage forms of estrogens.

The Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS), a substudy of WHI, reported increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age or older during 4 years of treatment with oral conjugated estrogens-plus-medroxyprogesterone acetate relative to placebo. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women or to women taking estrogen-alone therapy.

The WHI estrogen-plus-progestin substudy demonstrated an increased risk of invasive breast cancer.

Estrogens with or without progestins should be prescribed at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman.

ESTRACE should not be used in: women with undiagnosed abnormal genital bleeding; known, suspected or history of breast cancer; known or suspected estrogen-dependent neoplasia; active deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or a history of these conditions; active arterial thromboembolic disease (for example, stroke, myocardial infarction) or a history of these conditions; known anaphylactic reaction or angioedema to ESTRACE; liver dysfunction or disease; thrombophilic disorders; known or suspected pregnancy.

Estrogens increase the risk of gallbladder disease. Discontinue estrogen if hypercalcemia, sudden partial or complete loss of vision, hypertriglyceridemia, or cholestatic jaundice occurs. Patients dependent on thyroid hormone replacement therapy should have their thyroid function monitored in order to maintain their free thyroid hormone levels in an acceptable range. Endometriosis may be exacerbated in women treated post-hysterectomy with estrogen-alone therapy. The addition of progestins should be considered in these patients.

The most common side effects include: headache, breast tenderness, irregular vaginal bleeding or spotting, stomach/abdominal cramps, bloating, nausea and vomiting, hair loss, and vaginal burning, irritation, and itching.

Systemic absorption may occur with the use of ESTRACE CREAM. The warnings, precautions, and adverse reactions associated with oral estrogen treatment should be taken into account.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning.

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INDICATIONS AND USAGE

ESTRACE CREAM (estradiol vaginal cream, USP, 0.01%) is indicated in the treatment of moderate to severe symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy due to menopause.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
WARNINGS: ENDOMETRIAL CANCER, CARDIOVASCULAR DISORDERS, BREAST CANCER AND PROBABLE DEMENTIA

There is an increased risk of endometrial cancer in a woman with a uterus who uses unopposed estrogens. Adding a progestin to estrogen therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia, which may be a precursor to endometrial cancer. Adequate diagnostic measures, including directed or random endometrial sampling when indicated, should be undertaken to rule out malignancy in postmenopausal women with undiagnosed persistent or recurring abnormal genital bleeding.

Estrogens with or without progestins should not be used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia.

The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) estrogen-alone substudy reported increased risks of stroke and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in postmenopausal women with daily oral conjugated estrogens (CE) alone. The WHI estrogen-plus-progestin substudy reported increased risks of DVT, pulmonary embolism, stroke, and myocardial infarction in postmenopausal women with daily oral CE combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). In the absence of comparable data, these risks should be assumed to be similar for other dosage forms of estrogens.

The Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS), a substudy of WHI, reported increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age or older during 4 years of treatment with oral conjugated estrogens-plus-medroxyprogesterone acetate relative to placebo. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women or to women taking estrogen-alone therapy.

The WHI estrogen-plus-progestin substudy demonstrated an increased risk of invasive breast cancer.

Estrogens with or without progestins should be prescribed at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman.

ESTRACE should not be used in: women with undiagnosed abnormal genital bleeding; known, suspected or history of breast cancer; known or suspected estrogen-dependent neoplasia; active deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or a history of these conditions; active arterial thromboembolic disease (for example, stroke, myocardial infarction) or a history of these conditions; known anaphylactic reaction or angioedema to ESTRACE; liver dysfunction or disease; thrombophilic disorders; known or suspected pregnancy.

Estrogens increase the risk of gallbladder disease. Discontinue estrogen if hypercalcemia, sudden partial or complete loss of vision, hypertriglyceridemia, or cholestatic jaundice occurs. Patients dependent on thyroid hormone replacement therapy should have their thyroid function monitored in order to maintain their free thyroid hormone levels in an acceptable range. Endometriosis may be exacerbated in women treated post-hysterectomy with estrogen-alone therapy. The addition of progestins should be considered in these patients.

The most common side effects include: headache, breast tenderness, irregular vaginal bleeding or spotting, stomach/abdominal cramps, bloating, nausea and vomiting, hair loss, and vaginal burning, irritation, and itching.

Systemic absorption may occur with the use of ESTRACE CREAM. The warnings, precautions, and adverse reactions associated with oral estrogen treatment should be taken into account.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning.